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Here’s Our Fastest Ford Tractor

July 10 024 Ford 3600 tractor

Ford 3600 tractor.

We bought this quiet little diesel from fellow Martha’s Vineyarder Allen Norton. It’s handy for a lot of vegetable jobs like seeding and cultivation, a favored tractor for the tine weeder and it often works the bed former, making beds for crops like lettuce, greens, carrots, beets and more.

Many Morning Glory farmhands say it’s their favorite tractor. At 3,000 hours young, it also has the fastest road speed of all the Ford tractors in our fleet — a blistering 16 miles per hour.

Model 3600
Brand Ford
Engine 2.9L 3-cylinder
Fuel
 diesel
Year 1978
HP 40 PTO, 34 drawbar

Photo by Alison Shaw.

Photo by Alison Shaw

Meet the fleet!

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Quinoa and Pea Salad

peas
peas

Photo by Alison Shaw.

This recipe comes to us from Prudy and Josh at Vineyard Nutrition.

1 cup quinoa, dry
2 cups shelled peas
1 cup diced mango
1 red bell pepper, diced
1 cucumber, diced
1 cup halved cherry tomatoes
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 tsp. salt
ground pepper to taste
2 cups water
8 cups mixed salad greens
balsamic vinegar
1 avocado, diced (optional)

Bring water to a boil in a medium-sized covered pot.
Add quinoa, return to a boil, cover, reduce heat to low and cook for 20 minutes.
In a large bowl, combine peas, mango, bell pepper, cucumber, cherry tomatoes, olive oil and salt and pepper and mix.
Slowly stir in the quinoa and, if desired, the avocado.
Serve hot, warm or cold over a bed of mixed salad greens, with balsamic vinegar or low-sodium salad dressing.
Serves four.

From our cookbook Morning Glory’s Farm Food: Stories from the Fields, Recipes from the Kitchen Morning Glory's Farm Food: recipes by farm chef Robert Lionette, photographs by Alison Shaw

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Frying Oil Fuels This Ford Tractor

The Ford 4600 after its biofuel conversion.

The Ford 4600 after its biofuel conversion.

Our main tillage tractor from 1984 to 2000 was given a biofuel conversion by Vineyard Alternative Auto under a Vision Fellowship grant to encourage sustainable farm practices on Martha’s Vineyard. It can run on pure used fryer oil — biodiesel is not required.

With 9,000 hours of operation, this machine has seen a lot, including a severe engine fire while running at Waller Field in late 1980s. It came with a nice cabin, since decommissioned to only a roof, and it traded wheels with the 5610 in 2004 to accommodate the wider spacing needed for our two-row pull-type John Deere cultivator. Before the wheel change, this was Dan’s favorite tractor, but it’s slower now and doesn’t get the traction it did with its original wheels. It also has poor steering control and a lot of smoke in the cabin. But the old 4600 pumps a lot of water, spreads a lot of compost and can pull the disc harrow as well. 

Model 4600
Brand Ford
Engine 3.3L 3-cylinder
Fuel diesel
Year 1975-81
HP 52 PTO, 43 Drawbar
Special tools Dual remotes, cab, engine conversion for
biofuel burning

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Robert’s Seared Chicken with Rainbow Chard

Photo by Alison Shaw.

Morning Glory Farm chef Robert Lionette. Photo by Alison Shaw.Morning Glory Farm chef Robert Lionette says this recipe pairs perfectly with mashed potatoes of any variety. You may instead use your favorite rice or other grain, such as spelt or farro. Just be sure to leave enough time to prepare these longer-cooking side dishes.

This recipe makes one serving, and can be doubled.

For the rice:
1/4 cup cooked rice
2 tsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 small sweet onion, diced
1 small leek, with about 2″ of white stalk, diced
Pinch anise seed
1/4 cup diced butternut squash
2 leaves pineapple sage, finely minced
sea salt

For the chicken:
1 boneless chicken breast, with first wing bones intact
1 Tbsp. canola oil
1 shallot, cut in thin rings
2 leaves fresh sage, finely minced
1 oz. white wine
8 oz. chicken stock
1 oz. (about 2 Tbsp.) unsalted butter

For the chard:
4 leaves rainbow chard, with 1 inch trimmed from the end of the stalks
1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1 pinch dried chili flakes
1 pinch sea salt
1 oz. water

While the rice is cooking, heat olive oil to medium-high temperature in a pan.
Add onion, leek and anise seed, and sauté for two minutes.
Reduce to medium-low heat and continue to sauté until onions are soft and translucent.

Meanwhile, blanch diced squash in salted water for 10 minutes and strain.
Add blanched squash to the sautéed onion mixture.
Add sage and salt and set aside.

Preheat oven to 450°.
Generously season chicken with salt and pepper.
Heat oil on high in a sauté pan.
Add chicken, skin side down, and cook until skin is golden brown.
Carefully flip the breast and add shallots, sage, wine and stock.
Place pan in preheated oven and cook for 14 minutes.
Remove pan from oven and place on stove top over medium-high heat. There should be about 2 Tbsp. of broth remaining in the pan.
Add butter.

Meanwhile, cut chard, including stalks, into 1/4-inch ribbons.
Heat olive oil in a pan and add chili.
Add chard, salt and water.
Sauté 1 minute, or until leaves are soft.

To serve, place the rice into the center of a large, shallow single-serve bowl.
Place the chicken on top, wing bones down.
Pile the chard on top of the chicken, spoon the sauce from the chicken around the base of the plate and put the shallots on top of the chard.

From Morning Glory Farm and the Family that Feeds an Island.
Photos by Alison Shaw.

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Rainbow Chard

Watch This Ford Tractor Arm a Medieval Siege Engine

Our Ford 3000 tractor

 

Our Ford 3000 tractorEvery autumn, we celebrate the harvest with our Pumpkin Festival. It’s a day of fun on the farm with pumpkin games, live music, fresh food, family hayrides and, out in the fields, our famous trebuchet launching pumpkins into the air. Based on a weapon of siege warfare that originated in the Middle Ages, our trebuchet is strictly for fun — but it takes a great deal of force to pull back the throwing arm.

That’s where this tractor comes in. The second one we ever bought, it had 1,500 hours on it when we purchased it for $6,000 in Connecticut in 1978. It helped us clear trees and stumps from our first two fields, and is a versatile member of the Morning Glory fleet: agile for seeding and cultivation of 3- or 5-row bed crops, and very useful as handy farm loader for all kinds of tasks: unloading apple bins from the produce truck, moving winter squash and pumpkin bins, moving potting soil blocks and 900-pound hay bales, and — every autumn — pulling down the trebuchet arm so pumpkins can fly. 

Model 3000Ford 3000 tractor
Brand Ford
Engine 2.6L 3-cyl
Fuel gasoline
Year 1965-75
HP 37 PTO, 47 engine, 33 drawbar
Special tools loader with adjustable forks

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Martha’s Vineyard 2017: Save These Dates!

Strawberries at the Morning Glory Farm Strawberry Festival

What day is the Strawberry Festival? When is Illumination Night? What time is the parade? Mark your calendar now for these 2017 summer events on Martha’s Vineyard.

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Going for a hayride with the Ford 2N.

Meet Morning Glory’s First Tractor: The 1949 Ford 2N

Going for a hayride with the Ford 2N.

Ford 2N tractorWe purchased our very first tractor in 1973, for $700 from a farmer in New Boston, Mass. It saw heavy use cultivating corn, beans and peas before our purchase of a larger two-row cultivator in 2004. These days, the Ford 2N often runs the sickle bar mower for small mowing jobs or for harvesting corn stalks. It’s so light, we can haul it in the back of the farm truck. And it’s great for pulling the hayride wagon at our festivals.

Model 2N
Brand Ford
Engine  2.0L 4-cylinder
Fuel gasoline
Year 1949
HP 23 PTO, 22 drawbar
Special tools not independent clutch

Going for a hayride with the Ford 2N tractor.

The Ford 2N tractor in autumn.

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Spring Kale Salad with Mermaid Farm Feta

p. 162

Use any kind of kale, or an assortment: lacinato, curly-leaf, Red Russian all work well in this salad. You can also substitute any kind of feta. Mermaid Farm makes our favorite, right here on the Vineyard.

p. 162

Photo by Alison Shaw

1 bunch kale, 8-10 leaves, stems removed
1 cup strawberries, hulled, halved or quartered
1/2 cup pickled turnips or pickled beets
1 bunch globe radishes, halved, with 2″ stem remaining
8 oz. fresh feta, crumbled
1/2 tsp. sea salt
1/4 tsp. cracked pepper
1 tsp. tarragon, finely minced

Tear the kale into bite-sized pieces. Arrange salad in layers or toss, as desired. Dress with a light vinaigrette. Serves four.

From our cookbook Morning Glory’s Farm Food: Stories from the Fields, Recipes from the Kitchen Morning Glory's Farm Food: recipes by farm chef Robert Lionette, photographs by Alison Shaw

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2017 First Peas to the Table Contest

Photo by Alison Shaw

 

Be the Queen Pea, or King Pea!

Are you planting peas this spring? The first person to bring us a measured cup of mature shelled peas will be crowned winner of our fourth annual First Peas to the Table contest.

Bring your peas to the farmstand manager and if you are the winner, you will receive a $50 Morning Glory gift certificate plus a voucher for a free trip to the salad bar, and Meg Athearn will make you a delicious pea risotto using your peas! We will crown you and place the honorary sash upon you, and take a photo for our archives.

First Peas winner 1

2014 winner of our First Peas contest: Deborah Colter of Edgartown

Tom-first peas 15 winner

2015 and 2016 winners: Christine Gault (not pictured) and Tom Hodgson of West Tisbury

This contest was not our original idea. Thomas Jefferson and his farming neighbors near Monticello used to vie for the first peas every spring, with the winner hosting the rest of his competitors for a fine dinner.

But the Morning Glory contest is making its own kind of history: This year’s Fedco Seeds listing for the shell pea variety named Topps reads, in part, “In West Tisbury, MA, Tom Hodgson and Christine Gault shelled their first Topps on June 8 and won the Morning Glory Farm First Peas contest.”

That’s Tom smiling in victory in the photo above. He and Christine have won our contest for the past two years, and if you want to take them on —the time to plant is now!

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